Repair jobs are growing.

Few businesses continue to grow in a down economy—but repair does! More and more, people are trying to make the most out of the stuff they already own.

Thousands of locally owned and operated smartphone repair shops have popped up in the last few years. The electronics and computer repair industry in the United States supports 60,000 small businesses that employ 175,000 people, for a total of $21 billion in annual revenue.

 

FreeGeek, a Reuse Alliance member in Portland, Oregon, provides on-the-job computer repair training.

FreeGeek, a Reuse Alliance member in Portland, Oregon, provides on-the-job computer repair training.

Repair saves money. It saves the environment. And it connects us to our things. 

Repair jobs can’t be outsourced—who would ship a washing machine from Chicago to Shanghai for repairs?

These jobs are skilled, well paid, and continually in demand. Our stuff is here! That stuff will eventually break, and we will always need people to fix it.

Patagonia employs over fifty veteren sewers in Reno, Nevada to repair garments for warranty and resale.

Patagonia employs over fifty veteren sewers in Reno, Nevada to repair garments for warranty and resale.

“Mass joblessness is a shameful waste of human resources… and now threatens to create an underclass of long-term unemployed whose skills are atrophying.”
— Economist Alan Blinder
Heavy machinery repair experts like Ric Rea are expert at maintaining equipment under adverse conditions.

Heavy machinery repair experts like Ric Rea are expert at maintaining equipment under adverse conditions.